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Courses offered in SS 2024

Prof. Dr. Stefan Wesner with Dr. Lutz Schubert and Robert Keßler, Institute of Computer Science

[Lecture] Compute Continuum

Course Language: German

Modern computing has moved away from the desktop computer to the cloud, where resources and data are shared alike. Yet the Cloud computing paradigm suffers from the scope and complexity of modern compute scenarios, where data may reside anywhere, be produced and consumed anytime in any amount, and where users are mobile and distributed all over the world. To reduce the load on servers and the network, Fog and Edge computing were introduced - forms of distributed computing with flexible and variable allocation and load. This course will introduce the concept of the compute continuum, which aims at executing distributed applications flexibly over any infrastructure. The goal is to adapt immediately to different usage contexts. The compute continuum aims at scenarios arising from connected smart homes, smart cities, global logistic networks etc.

Within this lecture, we will investigate the relevant technologies to realise such an environment, and when it can be used, as well as its obstacles. The lecture is essentially segmented into three parts: The first part focuses on the hardware layer, including equally the type of processors, embedded system architectures and their connectivity. In the second part we will talk about the main principles of distributed computing, including how data is distributed and processed, and which use case criteria are fulfilled how. The third part is focusing on adaptive execution in the compute continuum, that includes embedded Operating Systems, virtualisation and containerisation.

Dr. Martin Lanser, Mathematical Institute

[Lecture] High-Performance Computing for Advanced Students

Course Language: German

High-Performance Computing (HPC) is about the efficient and fast execution of large simulations on modern supercomputers. In the lecture High Performance Computing for Advanced Students, advanced theoretical and practical aspects of HPC and parallel scientific computing are considered. Building upon the knowledge gained in the previous lecture Introduction to High Performance Computing, the focus will be put on shared-memory parallel programming using OpenMP and hybrid programming models that are tailored ideally to modern supercomputers. By considering complex model problems from the field of numerical solution of partial differential equations, concrete applications (also in the form of larger programming projects) will be implemented. Another focus of the lecture will be the increasingly important area of machine learning. The algebra required and the methods used for machine learning are ideal for the use on GPUs (graphics processors) or accelerators.

Courses offered in WS 2023/2024

Prof. Dr. Stefan Wesner with Dr. Lutz Schubert, Institute of Computer Science

[Lecture] Heterogeneous and Parallel Computing

Course Language: German

The course will start from an overview over current processor systems and development trends in computer hardware towards increased heterogeneity and specialisation, driven by the need for more computer performance and increased energy efficiency. The first section of the course will provide a base knowledge of processor architecture from a performance perspective.

In a second section, the principles of parallelisation will be elaborated on all levels, from large scale computing systems, such as high performance computing and clouds, down to multi- and many-core processors. This covers the principles of parallel programming and programming models, such as OpenMP, MPI and Partitioned Global Address Space (PGAS). This will also cover their limitations, such as Amdahl's law and the impact of data locality.

The third section will address specialisation of systems, ranging from embedded devices and multi-core systems to specialised co-processors, such as GPUs. The impact of specialisation on performance and energy efficiency, but also on programmability and portability will be elaborated. The future trends towards completely heterogeneous setups on all levels will be examined and assessed.

The lecture will conclude with an outlook on how processors will likely develop in the future and what this means for the programmability and portability of software.

Dr. Martin Lanser, Mathematical Institute

[Lecture] Introduction to High-Performance Computing

Course Language: German

The field of High-Performance Computing (HPC) deals with the efficient and fast execution of large simulations on modern supercomputers. In the lecture “Introduction to High-Performance Computing” the theoretical and practical basics of HPC and parallel scientific computing are covered. First, current parallel computer architectures are considered, from whose structure the necessity of two different types of parallelism (shared memory and distributed memory) arises. After basic computational operations such as matrix-vector and matrix-matrix multiplications, complex parallel numerical methods for solving systems of linear equations are introduced. Speedup, efficiency, and parallel scalability are employed as metrics for the quality of algorithms. Introductions to the concept of message passing using MPI and shared-memory parallel programming using OpenMP are given for practical  implementations. In addition, various software packages that can be used for efficient parallel scientific computing will be introduced.

Dr.-Ing. Achim Basermann, Institute for Software Technology (DLR)

[Lecture] Performance Engineering

Course Language: German

Nowadays, the development of efficient software is relevant in almost all scientific, industrial, and social areas. Examples are aircraft or automotive design, weather forecasting, crisis management, and analyses of satellite or market data.

Software is efficient if it makes the best possible use of today's, usually parallel, computing resources.

To develop efficient software code, a basic understanding of possible hardware performance bottlenecks and relevant software optimization techniques is required. Code transformations enable the optimized use of computer resources.

This lecture covers a structured approach to software optimization through a model-based performance engineering approach. This approach enables incremental software optimization by considering software and hardware aspects. Even simple performance models like the Roofline model allow accurate runtime predictions and deep insights into optimized hardware usage.

After a brief introduction to parallel processor architectures and massively parallel computing on distributed-memory systems, this lecture covers model-based performance engineering for simple numerical operations such as sparse matrix-vector multiplication. For massively parallel computers with distributed memory, communication-hiding and communication-avoiding methods are presented. Finally, the importance of performance engineering for parallel software tools, e.g., from rocket engine or aircraft design and from analyses of Earth observation or space debris data, will be discussed.

Prof. Dr. Stefan Wesner with Dr. Lutz Schubert, Institute of Computer Science

[Seminar] Research Trends in Parallel and Distributed Systems

Course Language: German

In this seminar a range of emerging topics in the field of parallel, heterogeneous computing (system Architecture for current and future high performance computing systems) and distributed computing systems (e.g. Cloud, Edge Computing) are offered based on primary literature from major conferences and journals in the field.

The task for the participants is inspired by the process of writing a scientific publication. Starting from a review of the provided literature the participant identifies additional relevant material such as scientific publications but also tech reports from major vendors to have a good baseline of the state of the art and current developments. Based on a topic outline a written report and oral presentation as part of a full-day seminar is necessary to successfully pass the seminar.

We plan to publish selected reports as an open access seminar series.

PD Dr. Stefan Zellmann, Institute of Computer Science

[Seminar] Rendering and Simulation with Graphics Processors

Course Language: German

Courses offered in SS 2023

Dr. Janine Weber, Mathematical Institute

[Lecture] High Performance Computing for Advanced Students

Course Language: German

High Performance Computing (HPC) is about the efficient and fast execution of large simulations on modern supercomputers. In the lecture High Performance Computing for Advanced Students, advanced theoretical and practical aspects of HPC and parallel scientific computing are considered. Building upon the knowledge gained in the previous lecture Introduction to High Performance Computing, the focus will be put on shared-memory parallel programming using OpenMP and hybrid programming models that are tailored ideally to modern supercomputers. By considering complex model problems from the field of numerical solution of partial differential equations, concrete applications (also in the form of larger programming projects) will be implemented. Another focus of the lecture will be the increasingly important area of machine learning. The algebra required and the methods used for machine learning are ideal for the use on GPUs (graphics processors) or accelerators.

Prof. Dr. Stefan Wesner with Dr. Lutz Schubert, Institute of Computer Science

[Seminar] Research Trends in Parallel and Distributed Systems

Course Language: German

In this seminar a range of emerging topics in the field of parallel, heterogeneous computing (system Architecture for current and future high performance computing systems) and distributed computing systems (e.g. Cloud, Edge Computing) are offered based on primary literature from major conferences and journals in the field.

The task for the participants is inspired by the process of writing a scientific publication. Starting from a review of the provided literature the participant identifies additional relevant material such as scientific publications but also tech reports from major vendors to have a good baseline of the state of the art and current developments. Based on a topic outline a written report and oral presentation as part of a full-day seminar is necessary to successfully pass the seminar.

We plan to publish selected reports as an open access seminar series.

Prof. Dr. Stefan Wesner with Dr. Lutz Schubert, Institute of Computer Science

[Lecture] Cloud and Edge Computing Systems

Course Language: German

The lecture is divided into three main parts.

The first part discusses key concepts and technology of cross organisational Cloud Computing Systems. Beside operation models, virtualization and container technologies in particular elasticity, scalability and why Cloud infrastructures are able to respond dynamically to changing requirements are discussed. Along an application use case the potential but also the limitation of scalability are discussed.

In the second part of the lecture Data Centre Architecture and Technology is presented outlining how the capabilities presented in the first part can be realised. This covers data centre system design, data centre components and software solutions to realize the Cloud properties as discussed in the first part. This will also cover const considerations and performance benchmarking.

The third part of the lecture covers multi-Cloud and Edge Computing Systems and their particular capabilities and challenges.

Courses offered in WS 2022/2023

Prof. Dr. Stefan Wesner with Dr. Lutz Schubert, Institute of Computer Science

[Lecture] Heterogeneous and Parallel Computing

Course Language: German

The course will start from an overview over current processor systems and development trends in computer hardware towards increased heterogeneity and specialisation, driven by the need for more computer performance and increased energy efficiency. The first section of the course will provide a base knowledge of processor architecture from a performance perspective. In a second section, the principles of parallelisation will be elaborated on all levels, from large scale computing systems, such as high performance computing and clouds, down to multi- and many-core processors. This covers the principles of parallel programming and programming models, such as OpenMP, MPI and Partitioned Global Address Space (PGAS). This will also cover their limitations, such as Amdahl's law and the impact of data locality. The third section will address specialisation of systems, ranging from embedded devices and multi-core systems to specialised co-processors, such as GPUs. The impact of specialisation on performance and energy efficiency, but also on programmability and portability will be elaborated. The future trends towards completely heterogeneous setups on all levels will be examined and assessed. The lecture will conclude with an outlook on how processors will likely develop in the future and what this means for the programmability and portability of software.

Dr. Janine Weber, Mathematical Institute

[Lecture] Introduction to High-Performance Computing

Course Language: German

The field of High-Performance Computing (HPC) deals with the efficient and fast execution of large simulations on modern supercomputers. In the lecture “Introduction to High-Performance Computing” the theoretical and practical basics of HPC and parallel scientific computing are covered. First, current parallel computer architectures are considered, from whose structure the necessity of two different types of parallelism (shared memory and distributed memory) arises. After basic computational operations such as matrix-vector and matrix-matrix multiplications, complex parallel numerical methods for solving systems of linear equations are introduced. Speedup, efficiency, and parallel scalability are employed as metrics for the quality of algorithms. Introductions to the concept of message passing using MPI and shared-memory parallel programming using OpenMP are given for practical  implementations. In addition, various software packages that can be used for efficient parallel scientific computing will be introduced.

Dr.-Ing. Achim Basermann, Institute for Software Technology (DLR)

[Lecture] Performance Engineering

Course Language: German

Nowadays, the development of efficient software is relevant in almost all scientific, industrial, and social areas. Examples are aircraft or automotive design, weather forecasting, crisis management, and analyses of satellite or market data.

Software is efficient if it makes the best possible use of today's, usually parallel, computing resources.

To develop efficient software code, a basic understanding of possible hardware performance bottlenecks and relevant software optimization techniques is required. Code transformations enable the optimized use of computer resources.

This lecture covers a structured approach to software optimization through a model-based performance engineering approach. This approach enables incremental software optimization by considering software and hardware aspects. Even simple performance models like the Roofline model allow accurate runtime predictions and deep insights into optimized hardware usage.

After a brief introduction to parallel processor architectures and massively parallel computing on distributed-memory systems, this lecture covers model-based performance engineering for simple numerical operations such as sparse matrix-vector multiplication. For massively parallel computers with distributed memory, communication-hiding and communication-avoiding methods are presented. Finally, the importance of performance engineering for parallel software tools, e.g., from rocket engine or aircraft design and from analyses of Earth observation or space debris data, will be discussed.

Prof. Dr. Stefan Wesner with Dr. Lutz Schubert, Institute of Computer Science

[Seminar] Research Trends in Parallel and Distributed Systems

Course Language: German

In this seminar a range of emerging topics in the field of parallel, heterogeneous computing (system Architecture for current and future high performance computing systems) and distributed computing systems (e.g. Cloud, Edge Computing) are offered based on primary literature from major conferences and journals in the field.

The task for the participants is inspired by the process of writing a scientific publication. Starting from a review of the provided literature the participant identifies additional relevant material such as scientific publications but also tech reports from major vendors to have a good baseline of the state of the art and current developments. Based on a topic outline a written report and oral presentation as part of a full-day seminar is necessary to successfully pass the seminar.

We plan to publish selected reports as an open access seminar series.

PD Dr. Stefan Zellmann, Institute of Computer Science

[Seminar] Rendering and Simulation with Graphics Processors

Course Language: German